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Women: Primed and Ready for Progress

For every ad featuring strong women and girls, there’s the inexplicable product that was marketed specifically to women—but didn’t have to be. From household cleaners to snacks, some brands are creating unnecessarily gendered versions of products and often charging women more for it. The spotlight on this practice, which is referred to as the “pink tax,” is growing hotter. And it’s leaving the door wide open for new brands to make waves by openly calling attention to pink taxed items, challenging sexist stereotypes, empowering underprivileged women and creating products that put the comfort and desires of women, rather than society’s expectations, first. For brands to succeed today, they nee

People Apparently Don’t Want Brands to Take a Stance on Political Issues, Study Says

It appears as though people want more brands to channel their inner Ellen DeGeneres. According to a study conducted by creative agency DNA Seattle that surveyed 2,000 Americans, 54% of respondents agree on some level that brands should help build common ground and avoid taking sides. Additionally, more than half at least somewhat agree that too many brands use societal issues as a marketing ploy to sell their product or services. “Just as political candidates are courting independent votes, brands can broaden their relevance to more people by championing common ground than by firmly planting a flag on the side of any single issue or candidate,” Alan Brown, CEO and co-founder of DNA Seattle,

‘OK Boomer’ Marks the End of Friendly Generational Relations

In a viral audio clip on TikTok, a white-haired man in a baseball cap and polo shirt declares, “The millennials and Generation Z have the Peter Pan syndrome, they don’t ever want to grow up.” Thousands of teens have responded through remixed reaction videos and art projects with a simple phrase: “ok boomer.” “Ok boomer” has become Generation Z’s endlessly repeated retort to the problem of older people who just don’t get it, a rallying cry for millions of fed up kids. Teenagers use it to reply to cringey YouTube videos, Donald Trump tweets, and basically any person over 30 who says something condescending about young people — and the issues that matter to them. Teenagers have scrawled the mes

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